All Aflutter for Feathers: Featherlocks Add Funky Flair to Hair

Feather-locks

The newest trend to hit the hair scene can partially be attributed to Steven Tyler, who has been rocking feather hair extensions from his seat as an “American Idol” judge all season. Feather extensions offer a fast and fab way to add style and color to hair, with the flexibility to go totally wild or subtly sexy.

We got the inside scoop on feather hair extensions from Alexandra (Alex) Litowitz, owner and creator of Featherlocks, the popular feather hair extensions brand that graces the locks of Steven Tyler and many other celebs including Hilary Duff, Jennifer Love Hewitt, Selena Gomez and Roseanne Barr.

How do Featherlocks attach to hair without causing damage?

Using real feathers that are made to last, Featherlocks extensions attach to tiny sections of hair with one silicone bead. The bead holds the feather to the hair and prevents any kind of friction and importantly, does not require heat to attach (unlike most extensions). That means no chemicals and no damage to hair.  Plus, Featherlocks holds strong even under extreme styling conditions including washing, drying, flat-ironing or curling. Clients can care for Featherlocks by using a sulfate-free shampoo to keep the feathers in the best condition.

What are the options for colors, lengths, and cost?

Featherlocks come in a variety of colors and patterns as well as varying lengths (usually 8 to 16 inches) that can be cut to fit in with any hairstyle. New colors are released constantly, and costs typically vary from $10 to $15 per feather at most salons. Usually, the longest part of the process is when the client is trying to choose a color; the actual process only takes a few minutes.

Where did the idea come from, and just how big is this trend?

Alex says that the original inspiration for Featherlocks came from hair stylists in Colorado, where the company is based. She saw someone on the street one day wearing a feather and was inspired. After doing some research, she found a farm that could deliver beautiful, real bird feathers but she had no intention of taking the concept commercial. The trend grew fast and a brand was quickly born. Now, nearly 3,800 salons in the U.S. use Featherlocks and new registrations are coming in every minute.

Are there knock-off products that we should beware of?

Watch out for any companies that use keratin, wax or glue to adhere feathers to hair, and also any that use heat, since heat is really what damages the hair. Other products may also have a tendency to bleed color from the feathers onto hair. Featherlocks has exclusive access to the real feathers from their farm distributor, so according to Alex, you won’t find the Featherlocks quality in any other brand.

What’s next for Featherlocks?

Alex says that big plans are ahead! The brand just launched Puppylocks – feather extensions for dogs, in the same color variety but the feathers are just a bit shorter and fatter. She also shared some top-secret news as an Arizona Spa Girls exclusive (we love those kind of tips!): the next big thing to hit hair will be Short Fat Featherlocks. The feathers are shorter and wider for clients with short hair, or clients who want the product very visible behind the ear. Plus, the Short Fat Featherlocks can be used as braiders – attached to the end of a braid to add a pop of texture and color.

Want to add some feathers to your do? We’ve compiled a list of local salons that use Featherlocks:

For a Featherlocks salon near you, visit conditionculture.com.

Comments

  1. i just got feathers in my hair its so cute

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